E. coli likes me more than you

Brainbow is the process by which individual neurons in the brain can be distinguished from neighboring neurons using fluorescent proteins. By randomly expressing different ratios of red, green, and blue derivatives of GFP in individual neurons, it is possible to flag each neuron with a distinctive color.

Let it snow!

Let it snow!

posted 1 year ago with 3 notes
Swedish scientists from Uppsala University will name their experimental cancer medicine after you if…

… you donate 1.51 billion dollars, so they can finish the research project.

The scientists are working on a modified virus of neuroendocrine cancer (a very rare disease that affected Steve Jobs). This form of therapy has been succesful in other ilnesses and the very specific virus from Uppsala has worked when used on mice.

Unfortunately, as the university hasn’t got sufficient funds to perfom clinical trials, the virus spent last two years in a freezer.

Although the results of trials may be unsuccesful, the scientists hope for a apperance of an eccentric donor.

posted 1 year ago with 2 notes
sheeeeeeepskin:

Birth of a Thought 
 
 Etching by  Susan Aldworth

sheeeeeeepskin:

Birth of a Thought

 

 Etching by  Susan Aldworth

posted 1 year ago with 18 notes
So I’m called the bromide-man in my group.
What does it mean?
When you do control electrophoresis on agarose gel (and you do it pretty often in genetics and molecular biology), you must use a flurescent tag, so that you can actually see what are you looking for and in that case you add some eithidium bromide to your sample. EtBr is an aromatic compound with heterocyclic core and when exposed to UV light, it’ll fluoresce with an orange color.
EtBt may be also mutagen and carcinogen, so you can’t use it without gloves. And if you must go to another room with the gel (or to another floor as in my institute), you shouldn’t touch anything (door, computer, your colleagues).
That’s why there is usually one person in a group that work with EtBr and on my year it’s me - the truth is I enjoy it quite a lot and now that I’m the bromide-man, I cannot escpae it either.

So I’m called the bromide-man in my group.

What does it mean?

When you do control electrophoresis on agarose gel (and you do it pretty often in genetics and molecular biology), you must use a flurescent tag, so that you can actually see what are you looking for and in that case you add some eithidium bromide to your sample. EtBr is an aromatic compound with heterocyclic core and when exposed to UV light, it’ll fluoresce with an orange color.

EtBt may be also mutagen and carcinogen, so you can’t use it without gloves. And if you must go to another room with the gel (or to another floor as in my institute), you shouldn’t touch anything (door, computer, your colleagues).

That’s why there is usually one person in a group that work with EtBr and on my year it’s me - the truth is I enjoy it quite a lot and now that I’m the bromide-man, I cannot escpae it either.

posted 1 year ago
Saccharomysces cerevisiae metabolism of arsenic.
Last week we’ve been working with Saccharomyces cerevisiae again - last semester we used them during genetics’ laboratories. This time we were trying to see what are the differences in arsenic metabolism between wild type yeast and mutated ones.
In the picture you can see wild type cells - the green halo (GFP) show places of arsenic metabolism right in cell membrane.

Saccharomysces cerevisiae metabolism of arsenic.

Last week we’ve been working with Saccharomyces cerevisiae again - last semester we used them during genetics’ laboratories. This time we were trying to see what are the differences in arsenic metabolism between wild type yeast and mutated ones.

In the picture you can see wild type cells - the green halo (GFP) show places of arsenic metabolism right in cell membrane.

posted 1 year ago
featherandmoss:

by Sid Black (Flickr)

featherandmoss:

by Sid Black (Flickr)

via featherandmoss · originally by Flickr / sid_black
featherandmoss:

Arachnoidiscus japonicus under microscope, from an antique slide.

featherandmoss:

Arachnoidiscus japonicus under microscope, from an antique slide.